Pure innovation awarded in South Canterbury

An inventive idea to improve air quality in the classrooms of Craighead Diocesan School received the South Canterbury Coresteel Buildings Innovation Award last week.

Year 13 Craighead Diocesan student Yaya Chanawichote designed an air purifier, which can be placed in classrooms to help improve air quality and decrease the spread of germs. It also has an attachable UV wand to clean shared surfaces within a learning space. She received a $500 Noel Leeming voucher for her efforts.

Yaya Chanawichote’s air purifier project was awarded the South Canterbury Coresteel Buildings Innovation Award.

Yaya Chanawichote’s air purifier project was awarded the South Canterbury Coresteel Buildings Innovation Award.

“We were impressed by the overall quality of this entry. Yaya carried out thorough research to examine potential solutions to the problem, and used ideas from existing technology to refine her solution,” says Heather Harding, Director, Coresteel Buildings South Canterbury.

During the design development process, Yaya considered a range of technological, scientific and practical factors to ensure the end product would do all that was required. “The final design combined functionality and form, demonstrating creative aesthetics and an effective, practical application,” says Heather.

The Coresteel Buildings Innovation Award was established to generate a sense of innovation, creativity and entrepreneurship within the student body at Craighead Diocesan.

A runner-up award was also presented to Year 12 Craighead Diocesan student Emma McRobie for her two-piece formal dress which she had designed and made for the school ball.

“Emma demonstrated a considerable amount of commitment, skill and effort in designing and making this dress. She took a common place problem of finding a stylish yet affordable dress and solved this with a practical, beautiful solution, for which we awarded her a $50 Noel Leeming voucher,” says Heather.

The regional school-level Coresteel Buildings Innovation Awards are a nation-wide initiative, spearheaded by a tertiary-level Coresteel Buildings Innovation Award at the University of Waikato.

 

Yaya Chanawichote from Craighead Diocesan School was awarded the South Canterbury Coresteel Buildings Innovation Award, presented at the school’s prizegiving by Rev Dr Peter Carrell, Archdeacon of South Canterbury and Mid-Canterbury.

Yaya Chanawichote from Craighead Diocesan School was awarded the South Canterbury Coresteel Buildings Innovation Award, presented at the school’s prizegiving by Rev Dr Peter Carrell, Archdeacon of South Canterbury and Mid-Canterbury.

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Emma McRobie from Craighead Diocesan School was runner-up for the South Canterbury Coresteel Buildings Innovation Award, presented at the school’s prizegiving by Rev Dr Peter Carrell, Archdeacon of South Canterbury and Mid-Canterbury.